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Types of Sake 

Tokutei meisho 

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There are several different types of sake, and the following special designations are specified by the Japanese government.

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Ginjo (吟醸)

Ginjo-shu is made with rice grains from which more than 40% of the outer layer has been removed by milling. Fermentation occurs at lower temperatures and takes longer. Distilled alcohol equivalent to up to 10% of the weight of the polished rice may be added.
It has a fruity fragrance, called ginjo-ka, with a light, that is low in acidity. “Light” does not simply mean “mild” or “diluted.” The sake should also have a smooth texture (mouth feel) and a good aftertaste.
The specific characteristics of ginjo-shu vary by brewer, with the more fragrant varieties designed to highlight ginjo-ka and others designed with more emphasis on flavor and less on ginjo-ka.

Daiginjo (大吟醸)

Daiginjo-shu is a form of ginjo-shu made with even more highly polished rice from which at least 50% of the outer layer of the grain has been removed. It has an even more refined taste and stronger ginjo-ka than ginjo-shu.

Junmai, Tokubetsu junmai (純米・特別純米)

Junmai-shu and tokubetsu junmai-shu are made only from rice, koji and water, highlighting the flavor of the rice and koji more than other varieties. There are no requirements regarding polishing ratio. Junmai-shu is typically high in acidity and umami, with relatively little sweetness.

Junmai ginjo (純米吟醸)

Because ginjo brewing techniques are used in making junmai ginjo-shu, the acidity and umami are toned down and there is a clear ginjo-ka.

Junmai daiginjo (純米大吟醸)

Junmai daiginjo-shu is regarded as the highest-grade sake. The best products in this class deliver a good blend of refined taste with acidity and umami.

Honjozo (本醸造)

In honjozo-shu, the emphasis is on flavor and there is little ginjo-ka or aging‐induced aroma. It has a reasonable level of acidity and umami and rather than asserting the aroma and taste of the sake itself, it helps to bring out the taste of food.

Others 

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Sake varieties are also distinguished by brewing method.

Shinshu (新酒)

Sake brewed during the current year.

Koshu (古酒)

Matured Sake that has been stored for a long time.
Period of maturation can be authenticated.

Genshu (原酒)

Undiluted sake. Many genshu have a high alcohol content and have strong taste, because there is no addition of water after pressing.

Tezukuri (手造り)

Hand-made
Junmai-shu or honjozo-shu that has been brewed using certain traditional methods.

Namazake (Nama-shu) (生酒)

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Usually, sake is pasteurized twice before being bottled.
Namazake (Nama-shu) is sake bottled without being pasteurized at all.

Nama-chozo-shu (生貯蔵酒)

Nama-chozo-shu is sake pasteurized only once at bottling after maturation.

Namazume-shu (生詰め酒)

Namazume-shu is bottled sake pasteurized only once before maturation.

Kijoshu (貴醸酒)

This term derives from ancient Japanese book Engishiki, which records a unique mixing process, shiori, using sake instead of water in the brewing process. There are sub-varieties of Kijoshu, such as koshu, namazake etc.

Ki-ippon (生一本)

The term means junmai-shu brewed at only one brewery, rather than having been blended from more than one brewery.

Taruzake (樽酒)

Cask sake. sake that has been kept in a cedar cask, has its own special aroma.

Hiyaoroshi (冷やおろし)

This is an old-style way of marketing namazume-shu. It refers to sake that has been pasteurized only once and aged from the winter until the following fall before marketing.

Nigorizake (濁り酒)

The moromi is filtered through a coarse cloth which produces cloudy sake, called nigorizake. In the past, it was unpasteurized and contained living yeast. However, these days, much of the nigorizake is pasteurized to stabilize the quality.